Where Some Things Are Remembered

November 30, 2018

Dom Moraes was not only one of India’s greatest poets, he was also an extraordinary journalist and essayist. He could capture effortlessly the essence of the people he met, and in every single profile in this sparkling collection he shows how it is done.

The Dalai Lama laughs with him and Mother Teresa teaches him a lesson in empathy. Moraes could make himself at home with Laloo Prasad Yadav, the man who invented the self-fulfilling controversy, and exchange writerly notes with Sunil Gangopadhyaya. He was Indira Gandhi’s biographer—painting her in defeat, post Emergency, and in triumph, when she returned to power. He tried to fathom the mind of a mysterious ‘super cop’—K.P.S. Gill—and also of Naxalites, dacoits and ganglords.

This collection is literary journalism at its finest—from an observer who saw people and places with the eye of a poet and wrote about them with the precision of a surgeon.

An Imperial Disaster

November 30, 2018

The storm came on the night of 31 October. It was a full moon, and the tides were at their peak; the great rivers of eastern Bengal were flowing high and fast to the sea. In the early hours the inhabitants of the coast and islands were overtaken by an immense wave from the Bay of Bengal—a wall of water that reached a height of 40 feet in some places. The wave swept away everything in its path, drowning over 215,000 people. At least another 100,000 died in the cholera epidemic and famine that followed. It was the worst calamity of its kind in recorded history.

Such events are often described as ‘natural disasters’. In this brilliant study, Kingsbury turns that interpretation on its head, showing that the cyclone of 1876 was not simply a ‘natural’ event, but one shaped by all-too-human patterns of exploitation and inequality—by divisions within Bengali society, and the enormous disparities of political and economic power that characterised British rule on the subcontinent.

With South Asia, especially Bangladesh and India, facing rising sea levels and stronger, more frequent storms, there is every reason to revisit this terrible calamity. An Imperial Disaster is troubling but essential reading: immensely relevant history for an age of climate change.

When I Was a Boy

November 30, 2018

In this beautiful, heartfelt and often humorous mini-autobiography, beloved storyteller Ruskin Bond relives the days of his childhood and teenage. He writes of carefree days in the port city of Jamnagar where little boy Ruskin read books upside down, wandered into rambling empty palaces, went for rides on lurching boats and in swooping, looping aeroplanes, and listened to tall tales told by a loving ayah and a colourful cook. He also describes his schooldays in Shimla—being dressed up as Humpty Dumpty for his very first stage performance, making friends, planning pranks and discovering a secret tunnel. He remembers his days in Delhi, where he lived with his father for one magical year when they explored monuments and cinema halls and became each other’s closest companions. And he recalls his time in Dehra when he developed his love for reading and writing, cycled far and wide and loafed in the bazaar with new-found friends, and finally set out on the path of becoming a writer.

Funny and imaginative, nostalgic and tender, this timeless book—embellished with lovely colour illustrations—is a record of a very special childhood.

British Odd – Desi

November 29, 2018

Please Note:
The price of this book inclusive of shipping and packaging charges is Rs.3300 in India
The price of this book inclusive of shipping and packaging charges is Rs.5100 outside India

This book is an outcome of the efforts of all the contributors who have been past employees of The British Council in India. I am very appreciative of their indulgence and patience. The book is a limited edition print, which aims to highlight the learning and training that all of us have been through in the corridors of Jor Bagh, Rafi Marg and Kasturba Gandhi Marg not forgetting short stints in the UK. The articles are the sort of experience sharing that I aimed to manifest through the book.

The contributors have been on an Indo-British journey that has been very adventurous for some, exciting for others, unpleasant for a few but definitely educative for all. The British colleagues have also benefitted from living in India, albeit for short durations and working with Local Staff (the Odd Desi) and the two have mingled well. The proof of their integration is the Memories that remain etched in the minds of each of the contributors.

This book has been published in a no profit no loss basis by Speaking Tiger under its imprint Tiger Print.

Conceptualised, Co-ordinated, Compiled and Co-Financed by: Frank Joseph Victor (popularly known as Joe Victor).

Jiya Jale

November 1, 2018

A legend of Hindi cinema, Gulzar is among the Subcontinent’s finest poets and lyricists, whose songs have touched millions. He remains as popular today, and as sensitive a chronicler of our emotions, as he was half a century ago. And throughout, his work has been gloriously distinctive—especially for the unforgettable images and the intimacy he brings to his songs.
In this book of conversations with the acclaimed author and documentary filmmaker Nasreen Munni Kabir, Gulzar speaks about the making of his most enduring songs—from ‘Mora gora ang lai le’ (Bandini; 1963) and ‘Dil dhoondta hai’ (Mausam; 1975) to ‘Jiya jale’ (Dil Se; 1998) and ‘Dil toh bachcha hai ji’ (Ishqiya; 2010). He also discusses the songs of other greats, like Shailendra and Sahir Ludhianvi; his favourite music directors, like SD and RD Burman, Hemant Kumar and AR Rahman; and several playback singers, among them, Lata Mangeshkar, Mohammed Rafi, Asha Bhosle, Vani Jairam, Jagjit Singh and Bhupinder Singh.
Full of insight, anecdote and analysis—and containing over 40 songs, in roman script and English translation—this book is a treasure for students and lovers of Hindi cinema, music and poetry.

Connaught Place and the Making of New Delhi

November 1, 2018

The origin of New Delhi can be traced to the Coronation Durbar in December 1911, where Emperor George V announced the transfer of the capital of the British Empire in India from Calcutta to Delhi.
Swapna Liddle traces in fascinating detail the events that led up to that historic day: the deliberations over the choice of location; the roles played by the Viceroy, Lord Hardinge, and the two principal architects, Edwin Lutyens and Herbert Baker; and, finally, the naming of the capital as ‘New Delhi’—to distinguish it from the old city of Shahjahanabad.
Even as the new capital took shape, it was Connaught Place that gave life to the city. Designed as a shopping and commercial centre for the elite—both British and Indian—it boasted of the most exclusive shops, cinemas and restaurants.
While many of the old familiar haunts like Gaylord, Volga and Regal Cinema have shut their doors, Connaught Place continues to reinvent itself with shiny new multiplexes, branded stores and restaurants taking their place. A guidebook of the early 1940s described Connaught Place as ‘indeed the most fashionable shopping centre…and, undoubtedly the most progressive part of the most progressive town in the country.’ The crowds that continue to throng its corridors, both young and old, visitors to the city and residents alike, bear testimony to the statement.
Rare photographs and illustrations add to its value as a classic amongst city biographies, in keeping with Liddle’s earlier book, Chandni Chowk: The Mughal City of Old Delhi.

Fat

November 1, 2018

• Why have we Indians become so suddenly, and so quickly, obese?

• Why are our children overweight? Will they be diabetic and hypertensive before they are thirty?

• What is making us overweight? Is it our ‘homefood’ or ‘outsidefood’?

• What happens to food once we eat it, and how is it linked to obesity?

• And if we are obese, what can we do about it?

In Fat, doctors Ishrat Syed and Kalpana Swaminathan meld the newest research with their own clinical experience to answer these questions and uncover the links between food and our bodies. We discover the magical relationship between the brain and the fat cell; how it enhances our enjoyment of a delicious meal, how it tricks us into choosing the right foods in the right amounts, and how this perfect balance can go haywire. We learn of the ways in which the stresses of our modern lifestyles—especially in urban India—are pushing us into becoming overweight, and what we can do about it. We learn, also, the essential principles of the perfectly balanced meal and how simple it is to implement them in our kitchens.

Specially focused on India, this accessible and timely volume tells us everything we need to know about our body, the food we eat to fuel it, and what we must guard against—and do—so that we keep ourselves, and our children, healthy and energized.

Cancer, Your Body and Your Diet

November 1, 2018

• Can our diet have an impact on the prevention of cancer?
• What kind of foods should we eat if we are undergoing surgery, chemotherapy or radiation?
• What kind of foods should we cut out to avoid and recover from cancer?

In Cancer, Your Body and Your Diet, Dr Arati Bhatia breaks down the latest research, and uses her own clinical and personal experiences to answer these, and other, pressing questions about cancer. She explains the hows and whys of the cancer cell cycle, what to do after being diagnosed with cancer, and the crucial role that food plays in the prevention and treatment of all types of cancers.
The author, a medical doctor, is herself a cancer survivor and later, was her husband’s primary caregiver in his own fight against cancer. Drawing on these experiences, she takes readers through every stage, from diagnosis to therapy (chemo, surgery or radiation) to palliative care, with a focus on the quality of a cancer patient’s life. She applies her considerable medical training and experience to advise cancer patients, their relatives and caregivers, as well as the general health-conscious public who want to avoid cancer.
Practical, informative and complete with diet advice and eating schedules, this is an accessible and immensely useful handbook for fighting against cancer and leading a healthier, fuller life.

Big Bhishma in Madras

November 1, 2018

This title will be available by 5 December 2018

A chance comment in 1974 fired Peter Brook and Jean-Claude Carrière with the idea of producing a play based on the epic. Together they travelled across India, searching for all possible theatrical forms of the great poem. The result was an epic play—9 hours with two intermissions—later made into a film and a TV series, which has become a landmark in theatre. Another result was this delightful book made from the notes that Carriere jotted down during his travels, whose charm is enhanced by his piquant illustrations that run through the pages.

The ‘sacred frenzy’ of Theyyam in a Kerala village and the intricacies of Kathakali are interwoven with their encounters with the aged Shankaracharya of Kanchipuram, a ‘one-in-three saint’, and the legendary Satyajit Ray in Kolkata. Here they also meet Professor P. Lal, who has been working for twenty years on translating the Mahabharata into English. It is vignettes like these that make their search for the epic into a journey that shows India, through Carrière’s words and sketches, in a way it has never been seen before.

Great Economic Thinkers

November 1, 2018

This volume presents an accessible introduction to the lives and works of the most influential economists of modern times. Free from confusing jargon and equations, it describes and discusses key economic concepts—among others, cognitive biases, saving, entrepreneurship, game theory, liberalism, laissez-faire and welfare economics—showing how they have come to shape how we see ourselves and our society today.
All of the economists featured—Adam Smith, David Ricardo, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Alfred Marshall, Joseph Schumpeter, John Maynard Keynes, and Nobel Prize-winners Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman, John Forbes Nash Jr, Daniel Kahneman, Amartya Sen and Joseph Stiglitz—have had a profound influence on our attitudes towards market intervention and regulation, taxation, trade and monetary policy. Each chapter combines a biographical outline of a single thinker with critical analysis of their contribution to economic thought.
If you’ve ever wanted to find out more about the foundational concepts of modern economics—the invisible hand, Marxism, Keynesianism, creative destruction and behavioral economics, and many others—this book is perfect for you.

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