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Reviews

May 22, 2017

‘Never judge a book by its cover, but in the case of The Sun and Two Seas this might be misplaced. If you find yourself purchasing the book for the sheer beauty of its cover illustration you would have made a wise decision. The writing and the story within these covers is of epic proportions and leaves you wanting a sequel, a prequel or a spin-off!’ Book review of The Sun and Two Seas by Vikramajit Ram.

May 15, 2017

‘The book is entertaining and rich, highlighting the fact that English has never stood still — one of the latest words dates to 1954. But then, that would apply to an Indian language like Bengali as well. Languages have the freedom to reach out and borrow and then reinvent themselves all over again. In the process is a kind of shape-shifting that Shakespeare would have appreciated if it had been pointed out to him.’
Book review of ‘May we Borrow your Language?’ by Philip Gooden.

May 9, 2017

‘One Thousand Days in a Refrigerator is a collection of fourteen short stories originally written in Odia, and translated into English by Snehaprava Das. Translation, we are all aware, is an extremely difficult and challenging enterprise. And yet we see translators like Das (or say, Arunava Sinha from West Bengal) boldly take the risk of offering us an ‘authentic’ taste of vernacular literature. ‘
Book review of One Thousand Days in a Refrigerator by Manoj Kumar Panda, translated by Snehaprava Das.

May 9, 2017

‘Gokhale’s one worry while translating the prose was to not loose the original spirit. Right at the onset, you get an idea that Gokhale has managed to keep the soul of Dhag intact where lines such as the one where while making bhakris (flatbread) of coarse millet capture the local colour: “They might be accompanied by vegetables, and then again not.” Book review of Kautik on Embers by Uddhav J. Shelke, translated by Shanta Gokhale.

May 1, 2017

‘If you’ve ever wrestled with the question of what love is, and what use it has for you, then read the two novellas of Jaina Sanga’s Tourist Season.’ Book review of Tourist Season: Two Novellas by Jaina Sanga.

April 24, 2017

‘The best thing about English language is its dynamic nature, which allows one linguistic stratum to blend with another.’ Book review of May We Borrow Your Language? by Phillip Godden.

April 17, 2017

‘Saraf has researched and written this book over the years, and the effort shows on every page. The sprawling canvas captures the roots of the Marwari community, their work ethic, and their rise against the backdrop of a country in evolution.’ Book review of Harilal and Sons by Sujit Saraf.

April 7, 2017

‘It is a compelling read, with its understanding of character, its evocation of landscape, and her knowledge of life in a British station in India.’ Book review of The Woman in the Bazaar by Alice Perrin.

March 27, 2017

‘[Perhaps Tomorrow] also sheds light on the work laws and the precarious living conditions of workers abroad. They risked – and continue to risk—being bullied, humiliated and often starved and beaten.’Book review of Perhaps Tomorrow – The Memoir of a Sri Lankan Housemaid in the Middle East by Pooranam Elayathamby with Richard Anderson.

March 27, 2017

‘A season for Martyrs by Bina Shah is a brilliant book which tells the history of Sindh, a province of Pakistan. She mixes myth with history and the personal with the political. She presents picture of Sindh by narrating past with its entire glorious spiritual, cultural and political heritage.’ Book review of A Season for Martyrs by Bina Shah.

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    Born into an eminent merchant family in Ladakh in 1918, Khwaja Abdul Wahid Radhu, often described as ‘the last caravaneer of Tibet and Central Asia’, led an unusual life of adventure, inspiration and enlightenment. His ancestors and elders, and later he, had the honour of leading the biannual caravan between Ladakh and Tibet, which carried […]

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